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Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
Al Jazeera America
Dec 4, 2013 10:00pm EST
to this. this is a quote from the national association for medical research. he told the science insider website assigning rights akin to what humans have would be chaotic for the research community and doctor susan larson, an anatomist at storage brook studying the way chimps move, everything i do with these animals i have done on myself. i understand animal rights act visits don't want these animals studied. champ pans e studies played important roles in developing medicines for humans. people say shouldn't humans come first? >> well, the former head of nih last june said he had drunk the cool aid of animal experimentation. he thinks it was an error. the directliar of the nih is the one who said, we want to -- we don't think they should be used any more in nih sponsored. they are holding 50 back now that i think those 50 are going to go to sanctuaries. >> where would you want them to go? >> sharoninguaries. but they can't go there. so, we have a ranarranged with nap -- the north american prime mate sanction wary alliance. they have seven sanctuaries throughout the u.s. and that's where
Al Jazeera America
Dec 2, 2013 10:00pm EST
on to get there. >> i'm joined by derrick pitts, scientist at the franklin institute science museum. there's disagreement over the last few days about what happened to ison. nasa says it's a gonna, is there something there in. >> i think what happened, antonio was a to usle between this not very well consolidated nucleus, the gravitational pull of the sun and the heat of the sun, the heat of the sun sublime, frozen gases and the loosely compacted material left in the nucleus in the comments had nothing to hold it together. the solar wind took care of it after that. as we look at the images from the satellites looking at the sun. what we see is what's left of ison, a mere shadow of its former self. >> no hope that we'll get a good show in the sky. >> i don't think we'll see much from the ground. folks will be out with binoculars. a big telescope under dark skies might show us a whisk of what is left. it's left to the satellites on orbit. >> the possibility of it hitting earth was ruled out before it passed the sun. is there a chance that it blew apart and there are fragments that something
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)